WhatsApp launches new Channels feature that makes messaging with large audiences much easier

It looks like WhatsApp once again drew inspiration from rival Telegram for its new feature called WhatsApp Channels.

This feature allows users to privately follow the people and organizations they want to receive updates from, be it Manchester City or Barcelona.

Very similar to Twitterusers can subscribe to channels and receive updates, but unlike private chats on WhatsApp, they cannot reply to them.

WhatsApp channels are similar to Telegram channels introduced in 2015, which allow administrators to send messages to users who choose to receive them.

This follows from the news that WhatsApp developers I’m working on bringing animated emoticons to the platformvery similar to animated emoji in Telegram.

The channels allow users to privately follow the people and organizations they want to receive updates from, including football teams FC Barcelona and Manchester City.

The channels allow users to privately follow the people and organizations they want to receive updates from, including football teams FC Barcelona and Manchester City.

Since Telegram already has animated emoji, WhatsApp has faced accusations from some users on Twitter that it is “stealing” the idea.

What are WhatsApp channels?

Channels is a new WhatsApp feature that allows users to receive updates from people and organizations.

Just like on Twitter, users can follow any specific channel based on their interests – be it the UFC or FC Barcelona.

WhatsApp channels are similar to Telegram channels added in 2015.

Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Meta, which owns WhatsApp, has announced a new Channels feature. post on your Facebook page on Thursday, although he didn’t mention the existing channels feature on Telegram.

“Today, we’re announcing WhatsApp Channels, a private way to follow the people and organizations that matter to you right on WhatsApp,” Zuckerberg said.

“We create channels to be the most private way to communicate.”

Zuckerberg said Channels will start rolling out to users in Singapore and Colombia first, but users around the world will get it “later this year.”

Channels will appear in a new tab called “Updates” in WhatsApp next to “Chats”, “Calls” and “Communities”, which were launched last year.

WhatsApp is partnering with several organizations in Colombia and Singapore, including the Singapore Heart Foundation and fact-checking organization Colombia Check, to launch the tool.

Other global launch partners include the International Rescue Committee (IRC) and the World Health Organization (WHO), as well as the Drone Racing League, the UFC martial arts company and football teams FC Barcelona and Manchester City.

WhatsApp channels allow users to privately follow the people and organizations they want to receive news from, such as the FC Barcelona football team.

WhatsApp channels allow users to privately follow the people and organizations they want to receive news from, such as the FC Barcelona football team.

Zuckerberg said that users will be able to find “all the channels you want to subscribe to” over time once the feature goes live.

WhatsApp is also creating a “searchable directory” that will allow users to find hobbies, sports teams, news from local authorities, and more.

Unlike private chats on WhatsApp, channels are a “one-way broadcast tool” so if users receive an update through channels, they won’t be able to reply to it.

Channel admins – who can be business owners or employees of a particular channel – will send updates to anyone who chooses to receive them, whether it’s text, photos, videos, stickers, or polls.

For privacy reasons, the channel administrator’s phone number and profile photo will not be shared with people who receive updates.

Likewise, subscribing to a channel won’t reveal your phone number to an administrator or other subscribers, Zuckerberg said.

WhatsApp will also allow admins to decide who can follow their channel and whether they want it to be found in the directory or not.

WhatsApp Channel messages will only be kept for 30 days before they are deleted, although WhatsApp “will add ways to make updates disappear from subscribers’ devices even faster.”

Telegram channels, introduced in 2015, allow administrators to send messages to users who choose to receive them (pictured).

Telegram channels, introduced in 2015, allow administrators to send messages to users who choose to receive them (pictured).

Also, unlike in-person chats, channels are not end-to-end encrypted by default – a first for WhatsApp.

WhatsApp, which was bought by Facebook in 2014 for about $19 billion, touts end-to-end encryption as an important security standard for private chats.

End-to-end encryption ensures that only two chat participants can read the messages, and no one in between – not even the company that owns the service.

WhatsApp said in a statement: “Given that the purpose of channels is to reach a wide audience, channels are not end-to-end encrypted by default.”

“We think there are some cases where end-to-end encrypted channels for a limited audience might make sense, such as non-profit or medical organizations, and we are also looking into this option in the future.

“Naturally, the way people use WhatsApp will continue to be based on in-person messaging between friends, family and communities, and that will always be our top priority.”

BEST WhatsApp ALTERNATIVES

If you are considering uninstalling WhatsApp, you will be pleased to know that there are several alternative apps to choose from:

1. Telegram

With over 400 million users, Telegram is one of the most popular WhatsApp alternatives.

Although it is very similar to WhatsApp, what sets it apart is the fact that it gives you the ability to set messages to self-destruct after a certain period of time without leaving a trace.

Telegram also offers end-to-end encryption.

However, as a WhatsApp spokesperson noted, Telegram “doesn’t offer end-to-end encryption by default, so it’s not necessarily more secure than WhatsApp.”

2. Signal

Signal is one of the most secure messaging apps due to the fact that it is open source.

This means that the app’s code is publicly viewable, making it nearly impossible for app creators to sneak into any loopholes that could allow governments or hackers to spy on your communications.

3. Messages

If you’re using an iPhone, you can simply switch to iMessage, Apple’s own messaging app.

The app has a number of impressive features including no character limit, the ability to send images and videos, and of course Apple’s animated emoji feature, Animoji.

Unfortunately, iMessage is only available for iPhone users, so it will be difficult for you to interact with anyone using Android.

4. Google Messages

Google’s answer to iMessage is Google Messages, an Android-only messaging service.

The app replaces your stock SMS app and integrates with all Google apps and services, making it easy to share images or use the Google Assistant.

5. Facebook messenger

If you’ve put off using WhatsApp due to sharing data with Facebook, Facebook Messenger might not be the best option for you.

However, the app does offer a number of useful features, including games, secret conversations, and video calls.