Spring is on the way, but is it too early to start planting? Gardening experts reveal key date you need to know

Crocuses are blooming and there’s a stretch in the evenings, but even though it feels like Spring is on the way, is it still too early to plant?

If you’re eager to get out in the garden, you must make sure not to plant warm season annuals and tender perennials if there’s still frost on the way, or your efforts will be in vain. 

It’s best to wait until the last frost date in Spring, however, this will very every year and also by region – meaning you need to follow a different set of rules in London compared to Glasgow.

You can estimate when the last frost date will be using data from previous years, which can be found at Plant Maps. 

it may feel like Spring is on the way, but is it too early to get out in the garden and start planting (stock image)

it may feel like Spring is on the way, but is it too early to get out in the garden and start planting (stock image) 

However, gardening experts advise that you also check local weather reports for the most up to date guidance before you plant.  

While you have to wait until it’s warmer to grow tomatoes, for instance, cool-season vegetables like lettuce thrive in spring, according to bhg.com.

These versatile crops grow even if it’s still a bit chilly, and even before the last frost date.

If your soil has defrosted to the point where you can dig, feel free to scatter your cool-season vegetables seeds in the garden straightaway rather than starting them indoors.

Abundant display of colourful viola tricolour pansies, which tend to tolerate the chilly weather well (stock image)

Abundant display of colourful viola tricolour pansies, which tend to tolerate the chilly weather well (stock image) 

Examples of these are Swiss chard, kale and radishes, which grow surprisingly quickly in spring and tolerate frost well. 

But some flowers can also hack the cold before the last frost date and continue to bloom, including types like snapdragons and pansies.

You can also plant bare root trees before the last frost date because they’ve not yet grown new leaves, and will be fine tolerating colder temperatures if they need to.