Scientists have developed a perfect urinal that prevents ANY splash

You take p***! Scientists have developed a perfect urinal with a narrow opening that prevents ANY splashing.

  • The problem of splashing in urinals has persisted since their invention.
  • Scientists have developed a new one that promises to minimize this mess.
  • It has a curved inner surface inspired by the nautilus shell, long and deep.
  • They found that the result was 50 times less splash than conventional urinals.

Urinal splatter is a problem that plagues many men, but it may soon be a thing of the past thanks to the work of some intrepid engineers.

A team at the University of Waterloo has developed a “no-splatter urinal” that promises zero urine splatter no matter where the user is looking.

The urinal is designed with a special narrow opening and a curved inner surface that prevents drips from flying out of it.

It was presented at a conference of the American Physical Society. Annual meeting of the Department of Hydrodynamics yesterday.

In the abstract of their presentation, the team wrote, “Our new urinal designs will keep bathrooms clean and reduce the labor, water, and chemicals needed for periodic cleaning to provide more sustainable bathroom maintenance.”

Scientists have developed a splatter-free urinal that minimizes mess from users of all sizes (second from right). They also tested a conventional urinal (second from left) inspired by Marcel Duchamp’s sculpture Fontaine (far left) and two other experimental designs (center and far right).

The non-splash urinal has a deep, long shape and a surface geometry inspired by the gentle curve of a nautilus shell (pictured).

The non-splash urinal has a deep, long shape and a surface geometry inspired by the gentle curve of a nautilus shell (pictured).

HOW DOES A SPLASH-FREE URINAL WORK?

Through a series of tests, the researchers found that the angle of urination that results in the least splash is around 30°.

They then developed a new urinal that delivers a stream of urine at any flow rate and from any direction to a surface close to that angle.

The urinal has a deep, long shape and a surface geometry inspired by a nautilus shell or the smooth spiral of a snail shell.

According to the scientists, this splatter problem “has been around since the invention of the urinal over a century ago.”

To create their splash-proof version, they first decided to find out at what angle the urine stream produces the least splash when it hits a surface. New scientist.

To do this, they modeled a dog urinating on a tree, as animals instinctively know to raise their hind legs to get close to this “critical angle.”

They also experimented with a set of test urinals, firing colored liquids at different speeds and heights to see which created the most mess.

Among them is a regular urinal, one inspired by Marcel Duchamp’s sculpture “Fontaine” and two of his own design.

After each experiment, the team wiped off any splashes with a paper towel and weighed them to determine how much liquid had been collected.

Combining this data with a model of a urinating dog, it was determined that the critical angle leading to the least spatter was around 30°.

“Thus, a surface designed to always traverse a urine flow equal to or less than the critical angle prevents back sloshing,” they wrote.

The researchers tested various types of urinals, including one inspired by Marcel Duchamp's sculpture Fontaine (pictured).

The researchers tested various types of urinals, including one inspired by Marcel Duchamp’s sculpture Fontaine (pictured).

This problem of splatter mess

This problem of splatter mess “has persisted since the invention of the urinal over a century ago,” scientists say (image)

Based on the results, the team developed a new urinal that ensures that a stream of urine approaching at any flow rate and from any direction hits its surface at that angle.

Their design has a deep, long shape and a surface geometry inspired by the smooth curve of a nautilus shell.

The researchers ran a paper towel test with their new urinal, and the result was 50 times smaller than with a conventional urinal.

They claim that their design also performs better than standard urinals in unstable environments such as ship and aircraft cabins.

Unfortunately, it remains unclear if the team plans to patent their design and how much it might cost.

Droplets containing urine and feces from a flush toilet remain airborne for up to 20 seconds, a study has found.

Tiny droplets, which can contain small pieces of urine, feces, vomit and viruses, float into the air at mouth level after the toilet is flushed, a new study warns.

It shows that tens of thousands of particles are thrown into the air by a stream and can rise several feet above the ground.

The droplets were seen floating about 1.5m in the air for more than 20 seconds, and the researchers indicated that this posed an inhalation risk.

Small droplets and aerosols are so light that they can float in the air in tiny drafts before settling on surfaces.

Researchers say they can also act as disease vectors and can be sucked in by a passerby and infect them.

Read more here

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