Mercedes charges $1,200 a year to speed up their cars faster

German automaker Mercedes has caused controversy by introducing a $1,200 (£990) annual subscription to boost the performance of its vehicles.

The annual fee, which is $100 (£82) per month, increases power and torque (“rotation power”) for the EQ series of battery-powered electric vehicles.

With a subscription, the time required to accelerate from 0 to 60 mph is reduced to one second, depending on the model.

This came shortly after BMW offered a subscription service to turn on heated seats in their vehicles, with various pricing options reminiscent of Netflix.

Mercedes’ annual fee increases horsepower and torque, or “cornering power,” for its battery-powered EQ series of electric vehicles.

“Acceleration boost” improves performance

Mercedes-EQ EQE 350 4MATIC

– From 215 kW to 260 kW

– From 6.0 seconds to 5.1 seconds

Mercedes-EQ EQE SUV 350 4MATIC

– From 215 kW to 260 kW

– From 6.2 seconds to 5.2 seconds

Mercedes-EQ EQS 450 4MATIC

– From 265 kW to 330 kW

– From 5.3 seconds to 4.5 seconds

Mercedes-EQ EQS SUV 450 4MATIC

– From 265 kW to 330 kW

– From 5.8 seconds to 4.9 seconds

Called Acceleration Boost, the subscription is “coming soon” exclusively to US and Canadian customers, Mercedes says. Drive unit.

It’s available for Mercedes EQE models (starting at $74,000) and Mercedes EQS models (starting at $102,000), which debuted last year.

“The driving experience of your Mercedes-EQ is a new experience every day, especially its powerful and instantaneous acceleration,” the company’s website says.

Increasing acceleration boosts that performance even further – the engine’s electronic power boost also greatly increases torque, allowing faster 0-60 mph acceleration. The power of acceleration you can feel.”

According to the company, the increased torque will allow drivers to accelerate their car “noticeably faster and more powerfully.”

Fine-tuning the electric motors increases the maximum motor power (in kilowatts) by 20-24 percent, depending on the original power.

As noted edgethe subscription does not add to the vehicle’s physical hardware, but instead triggers a software update that unlocks the capabilities of its electric motors.

This capability is already built in, so drivers have to pay to access the engine performance that their car is already capable of.

It also suggests that Mercedes is deliberately limiting the performance of its vehicles in order to sell them as an option.

A Mercedes spokesperson told MailOnline that the ability to retrofit a vehicle with special features after the initial purchase is “a useful way for customers to flexibly tailor their vehicle and only use certain features when they are truly needed or desired.”

A subscription option called Acceleration Boost is “coming soon,” according to Mercedes.

A subscription option called Acceleration Boost is “coming soon,” according to Mercedes.

Mercedes unveils all-electric concept car at CES 2022

Mercedes unveiled its new Vision EQXX all-electric vehicle at CES 2022 in Las Vegas in January.

Even though this luxury car is still a concept, it has a range of 648 miles on a single charge, more than either Lucid Motors or Tesla.

It is solar-powered and designed with recycled and sustainable materials, including mushroom fibers, shredded cacti, and trash such as food waste.

The car hasn’t hit the road yet, but Mercedes has been basing its range on computer simulation tests.

The Vision EQXX was unveiled virtually at CES as Mercedes was one of many firms to forego in-person attendance due to Covid concerns.

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“We are constantly reviewing the concept of our offer in order to respond as flexibly and quickly as possible to the needs of our customers,” the press service noted.

“The goal is to generally offer on-demand features in the factory as well as in the store both as a subscription model and as a lifetime product.”

The spokesperson acknowledged that Mercedes will be offering the boost in acceleration as a permanent feature at a price that has yet to be determined.

The feature was not well received by car fans, one of whom called it “crazy”.

On Twitter, one user said: “So Mercedes is slowing down their cars ON THE PURPOSE so you can pay a monthly subscription to go faster? What the hell, we have to stop this madness.

Another added: “In the late stage of capitalism, people will pay a monthly fee to improve the performance of a car they’ve already bought.”

According to CarDealershipGuy, a tech enthusiast and anonymous CEO of a group of car dealers, there is a broader trend towards subscription creation across all industries.

“Subscribe to everything” is out of control,” wrote CarDealershipGuy on Twitter.

With a subscription, companies can be guaranteed a constant source of income rather than a one-time payment upon purchase.

Another example in the automotive industry is BMW, which caused a lot of controversy earlier this year when it introduced a subscription for heated seats.

BMW offers a subscription service to turn on heated seats in its vehicles, with various pricing options reminiscent of Netflix.

BMW offers a subscription service to turn on heated seats in its vehicles, with various pricing options reminiscent of Netflix.

The BMW maintenance fee is £15 per month for front seat heating, plus an additional £10 per month for steering wheel heating.

One Twitter user commented, “It’s like buying a laptop with a built-in camera and paying the PC manufacturer every month to use that camera.”

Another added: “BMW has started selling heated seat subscriptions on its luxury models. I don’t care how rich you are, you’re an IDIOT if you go along with it.”

Elon Musk’s Tesla, meanwhile, is charging £9.99 a month for “premium connectivity,” which gives drivers access to exclusive Wi-Fi connectivity features.

Are you tired of the color of your car? BMW unveils color-changing all-electric iX

Can’t decide on the color of your future car? Well, bmw you’ve been captivated by their all-electric iX Flow, which changes color from black to white at the touch of a button.

Today, the German car firm unveiled a chameleon-like sports car at the Consumer Electronics Show in New York. Las Vegas, Nevada.

The same “electronic ink” is used to change the color. electrophoretic technology built into the screens of e-book readers, with the exception of applying to a special film on the car body.

Electrophoresis works by using an applied electric field to separate molecules—in this case, black and white pigments—based on their respective electrical charges.

In addition to the aesthetic benefits, changing the color of a car can also be used to reduce the load on the air conditioning and heating system, the designers said.

In the future, the same technology could be applied to the interior of new BMW models, allowing drivers to change the color of their car’s interior as well.

Can't decide on the color of your future car?  Well, BMW brings you its all-electric iX Flow, which changes from black and gray to white (as pictured) at the push of a button.

Can’t decide on the color of your future car? Well, BMW brings you its all-electric iX Flow, which changes from black and gray to white (as pictured) at the push of a button.