By 2024, 3D scanners will be able to exceed the 100-milliliter liquid limit at airports

Airport security will be much faster thanks to new “advanced” technology that scans your hand luggage.

The technology is now being tested at Heathrow and Gatwick. airports, uses computed tomography (CT), which is already being used in hospitals, to look inside bodies.

At security screening, hand luggage moves along a conveyor belt and passes through advanced machines equipped with CT scanners to look inside the bags.

The scanners display crisp 3D images that airport staff can rotate 360 ​​degrees and zoom in on.

Detection algorithms draw attention to any suspicious objects that may require further inspection, such as liquid explosives.

The technology, scheduled to be implemented by 2024, means that passengers will no longer have to carry liquids and electrical equipment such as laptops out of their hand luggage.

Currently, travelers have to take these items out and put them on large plastic trays, which is the main cause of airport security delays.

Rules regarding how much liquid can be taken on board aircraft will also be lifted to coincide with the completion of the deployment. Time.

Airport security will be much faster with new “advanced” technology that scans your hand luggage in more detailed 3D, rather than traditional X-ray scanners and 2D images.

The technology, which is currently being tested at Heathrow and Gatwick airports, is based on computed tomography (CT), which is already being used in hospitals to view bodies from the inside.

The technology, which is currently being tested at Heathrow and Gatwick airports, is based on computed tomography (CT), which is already being used in hospitals to view bodies from the inside.

HOW DO SCANNERS WORK?

The technology is based on computed tomography (CT), an imaging procedure already used in hospitals to look inside the body.

At screening, carry-on luggage is passed through a conveyor belt and passed through advanced machines equipped with CT scanners to look inside the bags.

The scanners display crisp 3D images that airport staff can rotate 360 ​​degrees and zoom in on.

The algorithms pay attention to any questionable elements that may require additional verification.

The new equipment scans passengers’ baggage in 3D, which provides a much more detailed image for security personnel compared to traditional X-ray scanners and the resulting 2D images.

Heathrow did not tell MailOnline which firms are supplying the machines, although Analogic has already installed them at US airports.

According to The Times, the Department for Transport (DfT) has told major UK airports that old screening technologies should be replaced by a new CT scan system by summer 2024.

The UK government has previously said the technology will be rolled out across the country by the end of 2022, but those plans have been put on hold due to the Covid pandemic.

An official announcement from the government about the deployment is expected before Christmas.

John Holland-Kay, chief executive of Heathrow Airport, told The Times that the cars were slowly rolling around the airport.

“We have just started expanding the security area in Terminal 3, which will have more CT scanners, and the deadline from DfT is mid-2024,” he said.

“By then, the usual passenger experience will be that liquids stay in bags.”

Currently, liquids in carry-on baggage must be in 100ml containers, which must fit in one approximately 8″ x 8″ clear resealable plastic bag.

Currently, travelers have to remove plastic bags of liquids and laptops from their carry-on luggage and place them on large plastic pallets, which is the main reason for airport security delays.

Currently, travelers have to remove plastic bags of liquids and laptops from their carry-on luggage and place them on large plastic pallets, which is the main reason for airport security delays.

Heathrow did not tell MailOnline which firms are supplying the machines, although Analogic has already installed them at US airports.

Heathrow did not tell MailOnline which firms are supplying the machines, although Analogic has already installed them at US airports.

CURRENT RESTRICTIONS AT UK AIRPORTS

All items of baggage, including carry-on baggage and checked baggage, must be screened by airport security.

Liquids may be carried in carry-on baggage, but they must be in containers of no more than 100 ml (unless there are special exceptions).

These 100ml containers should be placed in one clear, resealable plastic bag measuring approximately 8 inches by 8 inches.

Electronic devices, such as laptops, need to be charged before traveling because if they don’t turn on, they may look damaged and therefore won’t be allowed on the plane.

When going through security, this plastic bag needs to be placed in the plastic tray as it passes through the conveyor belt through the 2D scanning machine.

New CT scan technology will allow travelers to store their liquids in luggage because CT scans give staff better and more detailed images of what’s inside.

Once the technology is rolled out across the country, the 100 ml liquid limit may no longer apply, meaning passengers can potentially take liquids such as a bottle of water or a bottle of shampoo through security.

The 100ml rule was introduced in 2006 after authorities thwarted a planned al-Qaeda terrorist attack on seven planes flying out of Heathrow using peroxide-based liquid explosives disguised as soft drinks.

If successful, it would have been the biggest al-Qaeda attack against the West since 9/11.

Restrictions on the amount of liquids carried into aircraft cabins were intended to be only a temporary measure until suitable technology became available to test liquids for the presence of explosives.

Now, more than 15 years later, CT scanners have been shrunk down to practically fit in airports, and algorithms have been developed that can distinguish harmless liquid from liquid explosives.

CT machines create a clear picture of the bag’s contents, and algorithms can automatically detect liquid explosives in containers, as well as solid explosives such as a damaged laptop with a bomb.

For the first time since 2006, rules preventing passengers from taking bottles of drinks and toiletries larger than 100ml will be lifted at major UK airports for the first time since 2006.  Pictured: The queue for a security check at Heathrow Airport in April this year.

For the first time since 2006, rules preventing passengers from taking bottles of drinks and toiletries larger than 100ml will be lifted at major UK airports for the first time since 2006. Pictured: The queue for a security check at Heathrow Airport in April this year.

The Times reported that the 100 ml rule will be abolished in 2024, coinciding with the completion of the introduction of the technology. MailOnline contacted DfT for confirmation.

Because the rollout of CT scan technology will be relatively gradual, some experts are concerned that security rules will vary from airport to airport, leading to confusion among passengers.

An unnamed aviation source warned The Times that “mixed messages” will be presented to passengers ahead of 2024.

“As scanners become more common, some lanes will tell passengers not to take things out of their bags, while other lanes will still have to do so,” the source said.

HOW THE 2006 TERRORIST Plot CHANGED TRANSFER

It was the debacle of a terrorist plot in 2006 that wreaked havoc at British airports and changed the way air passengers traveled by introducing drastic security measures.

Would-be suicide bombers Ibrahim Savant, Arafat Wahid Khan and Wahid Zaman were recruited by a British-born terrorist cell leader who plotted to blow up transatlantic airlines from the sky with improvised liquid bombs disguised as soft drinks.

Employees of the anti-terrorist service found videos of suicides in the homes of three men, filmed against the backdrop of a black flag and containing threats against the population.

Pakistani-born Khan threatened in his video: “We will unleash such horror and destruction on you that you will never feel peace and security.”

All three defendants were in the process of obtaining new passports, emptying their bank accounts or bail loans and visiting the home of Abdullah Ahmed Ali, the convicted ringleader.

As part of the overall plot, Ali was in contact with al-Qaeda leaders in Pakistan and sent them coded emails informing them of his efforts to recruit suicide bombers.

The flights he identified were from UK airports in Toronto, Montreal, San Francisco, Chicago, Washington and New York and were hidden on a memory card Ali had with him at the time of his arrest.

If successful, the explosions could match or surpass the destruction and devastation of the 9/11 attacks.