Boris Johnson claims Germany supported Ukraine’s defeat, France ‘denied’

Former British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Wednesday that France was “in denial” in the run-up to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, while German leaders simply hoped it would be “quickly over.”

“This thing was a huge shock,” Johnson said in an interview with CNN Portugal. “We could see Russian battalion tactical groups piling up, but different countries had very different points of view.”

Johnson specifically named three European Union countries that he said were less resilient than other allies in his response to “Special military operation” of Russia, which was launched nine months ago.

The then British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is interviewed by CNN's Jake Tupper on June 26, 2022.

The then British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is interviewed by CNN’s Jake Tupper on June 26, 2022.
(CNN)

BORIS JOHNSON’S RESIGNATION WILL NOT AFFECT UK SUPPORT FOR UKRAINE – EXPERTS

“At some point, the German point of view was that if this happened, which would be a disaster, then it would be better if it all ended quickly and Ukraine collapsed,” Johnson said, alluding to “all sorts of reasonable economic reasons” for their positions.

“I couldn’t support it, I thought it was a detrimental take on it. But I can understand why they thought and felt the way they did,” he added.

Germany has faced a huge backlash for its initial lukewarm support for Ukraine. shamefully sending 5000 helmets to the Kyiv troops ahead of the invasion, with other NATO allies deploying anti-tank missiles, drones, munitions and weaponry.

Kyiv Mayor Vitali Klitschko visibly ridiculed Germany’s supply and said, “What support will Germany send next? Pillows?

Germany has increased defensive aid to Ukraine, although Berlin continued to face some backlash at home and abroad for fluctuations in the amount of support provided.

France, which has always supported Ukraine, was apparently taken by surprise when Russian President Vladimir Putin announced his “special military operation” on February 2. 24 – although French President Emmanuel Macron visited Moscow just a few weeks before the invasion to urge Putin to keep the peace.

Then-U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson (left) and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky shake hands in Kyiv on March 9, 2022.

Then-U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson (left) and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky shake hands in Kyiv on March 9, 2022.
(Office of the President of Ukraine)

BORIS JOHNSON MADE A SECOND SURPRISE VISIT TO UKRAINE

Macron returned with ostensible assurances from Putin that he would not exacerbate the crisis that was then building on the borders of Ukraine, where Russia continued to amass troops.

“There is no doubt that the French denied it until the last moment,” Johnson said.

The head of French military intelligence was fired in March for failing to predict Russia’s plans.

Johnson also mentioned the initial reaction of Italy, then under Mario Draghi, who “at one point just [said] that they will not be able to support the position we are taking” due to its “massive” dependence on Russian hydrocarbons.

Although after Russia invaded Ukraine, the attitude of EU countries that previously resisted it changed, Johnson said.

The Ukrainian military fire from a BM-21 Grad multiple launch rocket system on April 20, 2022 in the Kharkiv region.

The Ukrainian military fire from a BM-21 Grad multiple launch rocket system on April 20, 2022 in the Kharkiv region.
(Reuters/Sergey Nuzhnenko)

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“It so happened that everyone – Germans, French, Italians, everyone, [President] Joe Biden saw that there was simply no choice,” he said. “Because it was impossible to negotiate with this guy. [Putin]. This is the key point.”

“The EU has done a brilliant job,” he continued. “After all my worries… I pay tribute to the way the EU has acted. They were one.”