Ancient Roman coin thought to be fake is now found to be genuine and proves the existence of a ‘forgotten’ leader

Ancient Roman coin discovered in Transylvania more than 300 years ago and found to be fake is almost certainly genuine and proves the existence of a “forgotten” Sponsian leader, study claims.

  • A coin found 300 years ago showed a chief named Sponsian.
  • It was believed to be a fake, as it was different from other Roman coins.
  • There are no other historical records of the Sponsian ever existing, but new analysis shows the coin is indeed genuine.

A forgotten Roman emperor has been rescued from oblivion as a coin long thought to be a fake has finally been found to be genuine.

The coin, found 300 years ago, depicted a leader named Sponsianus who was in power in the 260s BC.

It was thought to be a forgery, as it differed both from the manufacturing process and from the general style of Roman coins of the time.

There are no other historical records of the Sponsian ever existing, but new analysis shows the coin is indeed genuine.

A forgotten Roman emperor has been saved from oblivion when a coin long thought to be a fake is finally found to be genuine.

Who was Spontian?

The team suggests that Sponsianus was an army commander in the Roman province of Dacia during a period of military strife in the 260s BC.

Coins have always been an important symbol of power and authority in Rome.

The researchers believe that Sponsian may have authorized the creation of locally produced coins, some of which had his own image on them.

Only four coins with the image of Sponsian are known to have survived to this day.

The coin comes from a small hoard discovered in Transylvania in 1713, which ended up in collections throughout Europe.

Some of them ended up in The Hunterian Museum in Glasgow, where they have remained hidden in wooden cabinets to this day.

Researchers at University College London carefully analyzed the coins, three of which featured other famous Roman emperors, using a range of methods, including light microscopy and ultraviolet scanning.

On the sponsor’s coin, they found microabrasion patterns commonly associated with coins that have been in circulation for a long period of time.

The researchers also analyzed the earth deposits on the coin and found evidence that, after its use, the coin was buried for a long period of time before it was discovered.

According to the team, the new evidence strongly indicates that the coin is genuine.

They suggest that Sponsianus was an army commander in the Roman province of Dacia during a period of military strife in the 260s BC.

Researchers at University College London carefully analyzed the coins, three of which featured other famous Roman emperors, using a range of methods, including light microscopy and ultraviolet scanning.

Researchers at University College London carefully analyzed the coins, three of which featured other famous Roman emperors, using a range of methods, including light microscopy and ultraviolet scanning.

Coins have always been an important symbol of power and authority in Rome.

The researchers speculate that Sponsian may have authorized the creation of locally produced coins, some of which had his own image on them.

Only four coins with the image of Sponsian are known to have survived to this day.

Paul Piron, lead author of the study, said: “The scientific analysis of these ultra-rare coins saves Emperor Sponsian from oblivion.

“Our evidence suggests that he ruled Roman Dacia, an isolated gold-mining outpost, at a time when the empire was besieged by civil wars and the frontier lands were overrun by plundering invaders.”

Jesper Eriksson, curator of numismatics at The Hunterian, said: “We hope this not only stimulates further discussions about Sponsianus as a historical figure, but also research related coins held in other museums across Europe.”

The discovery was published in Plos One magazine.

How England Spent Nearly Half a Millennium Under Roman Rule

55 BC – Julius Caesar crossed the English Channel with about 10,000 soldiers. They landed at Pegwell Bay on the Isle of Thanet and were met by a detachment of the British. Caesar was forced to retreat.

54 BC – Caesar crossed the English Channel again in his second attempt to conquer Britain. He came with 27,000 infantry and cavalry and landed at Deela, but met no opposition. They moved inland and after heavy fighting defeated the Britons and the key tribal leaders surrendered.

However, later that year, Caesar was forced to return to Gaul to resolve problems there, and the Romans withdrew.

54 BC – 43 BC – Although there were no Romans in Britain during these years, their influence increased due to trade relations.

43 AD – A Roman army of 40,000 men, led by Aulus Plautius, landed in Kent and occupied the southeast. Emperor Claudius appointed Plautius governor of Britain and returned to Rome.

47 AD – Londinium (London) is founded and Britain is declared part of the Roman Empire. Road networks were built throughout the country.

50 AD – The Romans arrived in the southwest and left their mark in the form of a wooden fort on a hill near the river Exe. Decades later, a city called Isca was founded on the site of the fort.

When the Romans allowed it and the Saxons ruled, all former Roman cities were called “caestres”. this was called “Exe cester” and their merger eventually produced Exeter.

75 – 77 years AD – The Romans defeated the last resisting tribes, making all of Britain Roman. Many Britons began to adopt Roman customs and laws.

122 AD – Emperor Hadrian ordered the construction of a wall between England and Scotland to prevent the penetration of the Scottish tribes.

312 AD – Emperor Constantine legalized Christianity throughout the Roman Empire.

228 AD – The Romans were attacked by the barbarian tribes, and the soldiers stationed in the country began to withdraw to Rome.

410 AD – All the Romans were recalled to Rome, and the Emperor Honorius told the British that they no longer had contact with Rome.

Source: History on the web

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